Training and Education

Focus on Energy offers a wide variety of courses throughout the state of Wisconsin that will help meet your energy efficiency educational needs.



Expand your energy efficiency knowledge by enrolling in a variety of courses which include: Energy Management, Strategic Energy Management, Building Operator Certification (BOC) as well as technical training which include tours to further subject matter knowledge, when applicable.

 
 
Air Sealing Done Right

Through classroom discussion and slide presentation videos and hands-on demonstrations of air sealing techniques, learn how to focus on areas of concerns found during post inspections, the garage to house connection, heat sources, recessed lights and dropped soffits.  The instructor will discuss and demonstrate the installations of the right air sealing materials for the right task. 

Discuss strategies on using the blower door and smoke bottle and IR camera to locate air leakage pathways and using the same equipment to test and verify assure that air sealing installations created the intended results.

CEU: 1.0

Target Audience: HVAC Contractors, HVAC Technicians, Field Staff, Residential Trade Allies, Air Sealing Installers & Technicians

Optimizing BAS Control Strategies to Maximize Commercial Building Energy Savings

Most commercial buildings utilize a Building Automation System (BAS) to control comfort, lighting and IAQ.  Typically, these systems are poorly commissioned and operated resulting in occupant discomfort and complaints and high utility bills.  This 1-day course will cover commercial building energy use and will focus heavily on BAS control sequences/routines that, when optimized, can significantly reduce commercial building energy use

CEU: 0.6

PDH: 6.0

Target Audience: Facility Engineers, Energy Managers & Directors, Maintenance Personnel, Building Engineers, Facility Managers

HVAC Applications for Commercial, Small Industrial, Schools & Government Facilities

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a clear understanding of the typical HVAC systems found in commercial and small industrial settings. In particular; we will identify applications for each system, the components of the systems, how they operate, how they are controlled and how they can be optimized for energy efficiency.

This course will provide information focused on the Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning, HVAC systems that are typically found in commercial and small industrial applications. Specific systems will include; Air handling systems; Constant volume and variable air volume systems, energy recovery units, Roof Top Units, RTUs, heat pumps, and terminal units; VAV & FPB terminal units. The course will present an overview of the typical applications, components, operating schemes and automated controls of each system. The course provide a targeted insight into operating these systems for optimum energy efficiency. Each section contains the following format:

  • System
  • Applications
  • Components
  • Controls and Sequences of Operations
  • Energy Efficiency Optimization

CEU: 0.35

Target Audience: HVAC Contractors, Mechanical System Contractors, Operations & Maintenance Personnel, Facility Managers

Operations and Maintenance

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a clear understanding of recommended operations and maintenance protocol and procedures to drive operational efficiency and prolong equipment life. Typical HVAC systems found in commercial and small industrial settings. In particular; we will identify applications for each system, the components of the systems, how they operate, how they are controlled and how they can be optimized for energy efficiency.

This course will provide information focused on the Operations and Maintenance for systems that are typically found in schools, government, commercial and small industrial applications.  Specific systems will include; lighting, boilers and steam traps, HVAC, and VFD’s.  The course will present an overview of the typical applications, components, operating schemes and automated controls of each system. The course provide a targeted insight into operating these systems for optimum energy efficiency.  Each section contains the following format:

Basic System Process:

  • Create inventory or master checklist for equipment
  • Use qualified staff, contractors
  • Follow all safety guidelines and code requirements
  • Check equipment
  • Clean, repair equipment
  • Optimize performance
  • Replace equipment

CEU: 0.35

Target Audience: Facility Engineers, Energy Managers & Directors, Maintenance Personnel, Operations & Maintenance Personnel, Facility Managers

Compressed Air: Identifying, Analyzing, and Implementing Energy Reduction Opportunities

Do the employees on the shop floor still consider all air to be free, especially compressed air?  How efficient is your compressed air system (cfm/kW)?  What does it cost to run your entire compressed air system?  What energy efficiency projects have you implemented over the last three years?  If any of these questions peaks your curiosity then this course is for you! 

This course will provide the students with the knowledge and tools to assess and reduce the overall cost to run their compressed air system. By understanding and utilizing basic thumb-rules, the student will be able to calculate the cost to run their compressed air system, the cost of inappropriate leaks, and the cost of compressed air leaks.  Knowing these costs is key to help implement energy efficiency projects along with helping drive “no-cost” changes to their facilities operating procedures.   In addition, understanding how to utilize the Focus on Energy Program to provide assistance in identifying opportunities, providing potential incentives and;

Learning Objectives

As a result of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Estimate the associated cost of operating a compressed air systems and leaks.
  2. Develop Key Performance Indicators to validate system optimization projects and best practices.
  3. Recognize inappropriate uses of compressed air and associated cost.
  4. Identify, analyzes, and implement energy reduction opportunities
  5. Describe several best practices and new technologies for current and future expansion of compressed air systems
  6. Describe resources available through incentive programs such as Focus on Energy, Wisconsin's energy efficiency for potential incentives, financing, and assistance to implement Energy Efficiency projects.

The course builds on the knowledge gained during Energy Management and Technology: Beyond the Basics refining the students understanding of terms, definitions, formulas and thumb rules used to determine the operating costs associated with compressed air systems. 

CEU: 0.6

PDH: 6.0

Target Audience: Energy Managers & Directors, Operation & Maintenance Personnel, Plant & Building Managers / Engineers, Consultants, Utility Representatives

Energy Management and Technology:  Fundamentals and Beyond

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a clear understanding of energy terminology, supply and trend costs, and how to effectively read and analyze utility bills. The course continues with an overview of why energy management programs are a critical element in cost reduction and profitability initiatives within an organization.  Additional topics include how to establish an energy management program, develop an energy team, the importance of having a champion, defining and implementing polices and energy program goals.

Energy Management and Technology:  Fundamentals and Beyond addresses;

  • Why energy management programs succeed or fail;  
  • How to develop and implement an energy efficiency culture within an organization
  • How the Focus on Energy Program can provide manpower and financial resources to assist the organization in optimizing and reducing their overall energy costs.

The course builds on the knowledge gained during the introductory chapters and begins the process of refining the students understanding of systems, terms, definitions, formulas and thumb rules used to determine the operating costs associated with various energy systems, to include:  Building Envelope, Compressed Air, Lighting, Motors and Variable Frequency Drives, Boilers and Steam, Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning.

Energy Management and Technology:  Fundamentals and Beyond then addresses important topics relative to how the Focus on Energy Program can provide resources to assist an organization in identifying potential energy reduction project and determine if incentives may be available to help reduce the overall payback of the project. 

CEU: 0.6

PDH: 6.0

Target Audience: Energy Managers & Directors, Facility Managers & Engineers, Operations & Maintenance Personnel, Large Building Facility Managers, Environmental Managers

Strategic Energy Management

Strategic energy management examines the continuous improvement principles and practices of an SEM program.  Hands on exercises using SEM tools and templates give participants a real understanding on how to improve their energy management.  SEM elements covered during the course include:

  1. Modeling Past Energy Performance
  2. Conducting an Energy Review of operations and facilities
  3. Assessing Energy Information Collection and Uses
  4. Developing Operational Control Strategies
  5. Tracking Energy Performance Improvement
  6. Creating the Administrative Infrastructure for a Sustainable SEM Program

By undertaking and completing these six activities at their facility, participants can develop an effective and rigorous SEM program for improving the energy performance of their organization.  Participants in the training will be introduced to the ISO 50001 Standard for Energy Management Systems and the benefits and options for certifying their SEM program to the standard.  Participants will also understand the support available to them from Focus on Energy for implementing an SEM program.

Target Audience:  Plant Managers, Maintenance Personnel, Facility Managers, Plant Engineers, Energy Managers, Utility Representatives, and anyone with interest.

CEU: 0.6

PDH: 6.0

Target Audience: Plant Managers, Operations & Maintenance Personnel, Facility Managers / Engineers, Plant Engineers, Energy Managers & Directors, Large Building Facility Managers, Utility Representatives, Anyone with interest in energy efficiency

Process Heat and Heat Recovery

Most industrial and manufacturing facilities generates “process (waste) heat” which often ends up being exhausted to the environment.  Identifying, recoving and utilizing this waste heat for other processes within the facility can help reduce your overall energy cost. 

This course will provide the students with a basic understanding of a typical process heat system and the cost savings opportunities associated with recovery waste heat in the following systems:  process heat, compressed air and steam.  Through class participation, the students will be able to describe “what’s wrong” and the cost savings opportunities associated with various case studies.  Understand how to utilize the Focus on Energy Program for assistance in identifying energy savings opportunity along with applying for incentive dollars.

By understanding and utilizing basic thumb-rules, the student will be able to calculate the cost to run their compressed air system, the cost of inappropriate leaks, and the cost of compressed air leaks.  Knowing these costs is key to help implement energy efficiency projects along with helping drive “no-cost” changes to their facilities operating procedures.   In addition, understanding how to utilize the Focus on Energy Program to provide assistance in identifying opportunities, providing potential incentives and;

Learning Objectives

As a result of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Define the process heat system
  2. Sketch a typical process heat system block diagram.
  3. Describe the cost and energy efficiency opportunities associated with waste heat.

Key take-aways include: 

  • The ability to sketch a process heat block diagram.
  • Describe the cost and energy savings opportunities associated with waste heat systems.
  • The opportunities associated with the Focus on energy Program.

CEU: 0.35

PDH: 3.5

Target Audience: Energy Managers & Directors, Facility Managers & Engineers, Operations & Maintenance Personnel, Large Building Facility Managers, Plant Managers, Plant Engineers, Utility Representatives

Industrial Ventilation – Energy Cost Reduction Opportunities

Most industrial/manufacturing facilities have a negative pressure issue associated with their overall ventilation system.   This usually leads to excess energy cost, environmental and employee safety issues. 

  • Do you know why the facility is operating at a negative/positive pressure?  Is this desirable? 
  • Do you know the cost of operating your overall ventilations system, (Make Up Air units, Roof Top Units, Exhaust Systems, Building Envelope, Dust Collectors, etc.)?  
  • Do you have temperature, humidity, and/or air quality issues?
  • Do know what energy efficiency opportunities can be implemented to reduce energy and maintenance cost? 

If not, or you’re interested in learning more about industrial ventilation, then this course will be of value to you.  This course will provide an overview of a typical industrial/manufacturing ventilation system to include; ventilation terminology, system components, operating cost, energy efficiency opportunities, calculating energy cost,  case studies, and Focus on Energy Incentives.

CEU's: 0.4

Target Audience: Facility Engineers, Energy Managers & Directors, Maintenance Personnel, Plant Engineers, Facility Managers, Building Engineers, Environmental Managers, Utility Managers

Motors and Variable Frequency Drives

Electric motors systems are responsible for more than 65% of the power consumption in industrial/manufacturing facilities.  Understanding and analyzing your motor systems can provide opportunities in reducing your overall energy cost.  Do you know what it cost to run a fully loaded 1 hp motor for an entire year, when to install a variable frequency drive, and/or the decision point in purchasing a new motor over rewinding a motor? 

This course will review basic motor and variable frequency drive theory, terminology, purchasing cost versus life cycle cost, and operational cost, and several case studies.

CEU's: 0.4

Target Audience: Facility Engineers, Energy Managers & Directors, Maintenance Personnel, Plant Engineers, Facility Managers, Building Engineers, Environmental Managers, Utility Managers, Procurement, Environment, Health & Safety

Building Operator Certification (Level l and ll)

Level l: The Building Operator Certification program trains facilities personnel to understand how these systems work together and how to operate a facility energy efficiently. Whether your facility has already taken steps to improve efficiency or you're just beginning, BOC provides the training to keep building operators up to date on the newest energy technology available and to hear best practices firsthand from experts in the field.

With its national accreditation and broad network, the BOC credential is recognized by employers across the country as a sign of the value and contributions certified facilities management personnel can bring to their organizations.

74 hours of training and project work in building systems maintenance.

Level ll: Level I graduates who want to continue their training have the option of attending the Level II course series, which offers more targeted training. Building operators with extensive experience may be eligible to enroll in a Level II series without completing Level I.

To complete Level II training and earn a certificate of completion, participants must attend four core classes, two supplemental classes, pass class tests, and complete facility-based projects for a total of 61 training hours.

Prerequisite: Level l

Target Audience: Building engineers, Stationary engineers, Maintenance supervisors, HVAC technicians, Other workers in the operations & maintenance field

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